Street Culture

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  1. A Carnival of Mimics

    A Carnival of Mimics

    $45.00

  2. Vintage Tattoo Flash: 100 Years of Traditional Tattoos from the Collection of Jonathan Shaw

    Vintage Tattoo Flash: 100 Years of Traditional Tattoos from the Collection of Jonathan Shaw

    $60.00

    Vintage Tattoo Flash is a one-of-a-kind visual exploration of the history and evolution of tattooing in America. A luscious, offset-printed, hardcover tome--a beautiful and serious addition to the understanding of one of the world's oldest and most popular art forms.

    Electric tattooing as we know it today was invented in New York City at the turn of the 19th century. In the first days of American tattooing, tattoos were primarily worn by sailors and soldiers, outlaws and outsiders. The visual language of what came to be known as "traditional tattooing" was developed in those early days on the Bowery and catered to the interests of the clientele. Common imagery that soon became canon included sailing ships, women, hearts, roses, daggers, eagles, dragons, wolves, panthers, skulls, crosses, and popular cartoon characters of the era. The first tattooists also figured out that using bold outlines, complimented by solid color and hard shading, was the proper technique for creating art on a body that would stand the test of time. In the over 100 years since then, techniques and styles have evolved, and the customer base has expanded, but the core subject matter and philosophy developed at the dawn of electric tattooing has persisted as perennial favorites through the modern era.

    While most tattoos are inherently ephemeral, transported on skin until the death of the collector, a visual record exists in the form of tattoo flash: the hand-painted sheets of designs posted in tattoo shops for customers to select from. Painted and repainted, stolen, traded, bought and sold, these sheets are often passed between artists through one channel or another, often having multiple useful lives in a variety of shops scattered across time and geography. The utility of these original pieces of painted art has made it so that original examples can still be found in use or up for grabs if you know where to look.

    Vintage Tattoo Flash draws from the personal collection of Jonathan Shaw--renowned outlaw tattooist and author--and represents a selection of over 300 pieces of flash from one of the largest private collections in existence. Vintage Tattoo Flash spans the first roughly 75 years of American tattooing from the 1900s Bowery, to 50s Texas, through the Pike in the 60s and the development of the first black and grey, single-needle tattooing in LA in the 70s. The book lovingly reproduces entirely unpublished sheets of original flash from the likes of Bob Shaw, Zeke Owens, Holt + Rowe, Ted Inman, Ace Harlyn, Ed Smith, Colonel Todd, the Moskowitz brothers, and many, many others relatively known and unknown.

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  3. TF at 1: Ten Years of Quartersnacks

    TF at 1: Ten Years of Quartersnacks

    $29.95

    When you're a kid, all you want to do is skate. Jobs, rent, relationships, student loans, "your future," whether or not the door person at the bar you're going to after skating will let you in with your board--none of these things matter. As you get older there are more things to worry about and less time to take care of them all. Everyone reaches a point when they can no longer skate for 10 hours straight. Being a kid pushing around the city with little concern for time, you learn to make your money stretch. When your pockets only contain some loose change, a Metrocard, and nuggets of wax, the quarter snack from the bodega is the most viable option. Once you can afford actual meals and overpriced New York rent, the quarter snack becomes a symbol of a simpler time, back when you were content with skating on a diet that could lead to diabetes if not phased out by 19. That's when things were a lot more fun. Quartersnacks, an online epicenter for the skate culture of downtown New York, never cared about "best-of-the-best skateboarding." Instead, with acute self-awareness and biting humor, it chronicles the exploits of everyone bound together by a common interest in skateboarding in New York. Life isn't a high school movie where a crew of the best skaters in town exclusively skates together and terrorizes the losers. In New York everyone skates with everyone else--"talent" is secondary. Quartersnacks captures the energy of a session in the city with your childhood friends, some younger kids you just met just last year when they moved here for college, their friends visiting from out of town, and some token pros, all skating together. In the ten years that Quartersnacks has been active, New York has become a national hub for skateboarding (at least in the warm months) and more kids are skating worldwide than ever. TF at 1: Ten Years of Quartersnacks collects the best and worst from the site, along with new interviews, and documentation of the spots, the videos, the shops, and everything else that has changed and remained the same in New York skating in the past decade. Learn More
  4. Kill City

    Kill City

    $50.00

    by Ash Thayer Hardcover: 176 pages
    ISBN-13: 978-1-57687-734-0 Learn More
  5. I Know You Think You Know It All: Advice and Observations For You to Stand Apart in Public and Online

    I Know You Think You Know It All: Advice and Observations For You to Stand Apart in Public and Online

    $12.95

    The Know-It-All can be spotted from a block away in most any city today, devoted to the latest microtrends, sure that he is an influencer, never realizing he is mostly just being influenced. Often seen with others who share a similar look and viewpoint, he does not have a clue how to march to the beat of his own drummer. He spends his time in what he thinks is his refined circle, whether in real life or online, and always knows "the best", be it clothing, coffee, or culture. He is rarely without an opinion and doubts his own even less. He is largely without humor when the mirror is turned upon him. We've all seen and heard this type of guy in public and on social media: the classic jerk who thinks he always knows best. Chris Black is here to help you not become, or stop being him.

    Life for Chris Black over the past twenty years has put him in close contact with many of these guys, as they regularly congregate in the creative industries: film, music, advertising, media, and fashion. He has worked in all of these businesses and his astute and witty observations could only come from one who needs to know what is current in pop culture to make a living, yet is routinely able to step back and rise above the noise to keenly survey the scene. We've all had cringe-worthy moments in our past, and many are experiencing them still every day, only to realize it down the road. The chances for such occurrences are greatly reduced with the advice in I Know You Think You Know it All. It's not too late.

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  6. BA. KU.

    BA. KU.

    $40.00

    by Anthony Tafuro, Deer Man of Dark Woods; Deep Leviathon Dweller Hardcover: 224 pages
    ISBN-13: 978-1576877388 Learn More
  7. High Times: A 40-Year History of the World's Most Infamous Magazine
  8. Dealers

    Dealers

    $49.00

    Out of stock

  9. The Forty-Deuce

    The Forty-Deuce

    $39.95

    The Times Square Photographs of Bill Butterworth, 1983–1984 Edited by Hilton Ariel Ruiz and Beatriz Ruiz Introduction by Carlo McCormick Urban Studies / 80s New York / Hip-Hop / Style Hardcover 10.25 x 10.25 inches 124 Pages over 200 full-color photographs ISBN: 978-1-57687-578-0 $39.95 $46.00 CAD Learn More
  10. Live...Suburbia!

    Live...Suburbia!

    $24.95

    by Anthony Pappalardo and Max G. Morton Americana / Youth Culture / Suburban Decay Paperback w/ flaps 8 x 9.5 inches 240 Pages over 300 full-color and black-and-white photographs ISBN: 978-1-57687-580-3 $24.95 $27.95 CAD Learn More

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